No More Chalkboard Spam

A Message to my fellow U of C Students….

'PL'-this BS-'O'

The other day I was sitting in class watching a prof write some notes on the chalkboard. As per usual, he navigated around a big section of the board that was boxed off with a note “PLO” (Please Leave On) written over it. The notes he wrote were compressed and distorted as he really needed a full board to express the idea.

It got me thinking…

Watching my prof thoughtfully navigate around the box got me thinking of how this ‘bull’ was affecting everyone in the room. There we all sat to learn something new. The person sharing their idea has so many limits on communication to navigate and this PLO box was one of them.

I recall seeing these kinds of ADVERTISEMENTS on chalkboards back in to high school. I’ve seen them thoughout my 8 years / 2 degrees at U of C… They’re nothing new and they compete for our attention. Yet I’m starting to wonder why my profs generally respect and avoid these intrusions?

Read more “No More Chalkboard Spam”

SCHS 2002 Graduation

Well, it may have been 7 years ago now, but I was cruising through my files and came across this old video.. I don’t really know who recorded the original footage, but I decided to clean it up a bit and put it out there, after all, there’s little point having this video if it’s not shared!

So, here it is.. I hope many good old SCHS friends check it out and that it brings back a few nice memories for them. I expect some time around 2012, we’ll have to get a reunion setup. Hope you’re all doing well! Cheers.

Awesome CMOS illustration applets found!

So I’ve been dragging my feet, trying to really wrap my brains around how nMOS, pMOS and the ever awesome n&p party called CMOS really get along, when I came across THIS freaking awesome page that really provided the illustration for how these things work that I’ve been looking for! The page that hosts this demonstration page I’m talking about is for some university in Hamburg, so I’m really thankful their page was written in English.

Anyone out there taking a course involving CMOS logic should really test/augment their understanding by taking a run through this page. It’s so freakin helpful!

For those who are bizarrely keen, the course I’m taking that relates to this is ENCM467 at the University of Calgary. Feel free to check out my notes for some vague scribblings related to this.