DeltaFlyer Episode II: Prime Line Rollers

DeltaFlyer Episode II was originally posted to hackaday.io. I’ve mirrored it here for my own purposes.

For the Delta Flyer’s maiden voyage, I opted to go cheap and use Prime Line rollers (referenced in an earlier log). They’re fairly inexpensive and I didn’t have much grief finding them at a couple different local stores. They definitely have slop in them, so they’re not really a good choice and probably go from rough to terrible as print speed is increased. Episode II here is to illustrate how well these actually work.

I found that I could get passable motion. I ultimately replaced the Prime Line rollers with Delrin rollers. I was stunned to find the first prints out of the Delrin’s looked exactly the same as the Prime Line wheels. This led to eventually find my main source of error was my print bed could move during the print. Therefore, I’m not really sure what the quality limit on the Prime Line rollers really is. My guess is you could get pretty damn good but if you tried to print fast, the slop in the bearings would become intolerable.

My Photo Album for Episode II is here.

Cupcake 155 Episode 3

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Screen Shot 2015-09-10 at 5.40.57 PM

Episode #3 of my Cupcake155 project has been posted.

The key jist being that I found on complex prints, I would typically get a few major slips in the print. There often were also places where the print delayed in a location for a time, this left scars too.

Ultimately, a $10 SD board and a quick firmware change later and my prints were vastly improved.

Read more here.

Cupcake155 Episode 2

After roughly a month of effort, I’ve now got my old Cupcake heavily retro-fitted and running pretty well.

Cupcake155 Episode 2 gives the key details of how I modified my old MakerBot Cupcake in to something modern and unique. Others may find it helpful to re-trace my steps and perhaps get printing sooner!

Cupcake155 Episode 1

I’ve missed playing with 3D printing since I mothballed my printer years ago. It was shelved over major pains in getting the extruder to work properly. I also wasn’t especially fond of working with ABS plastic, which feels pretty toxic to me.

A few weeks back I decided that my old printer, while in bad shape, was still most of a 3D-printer. I had been looking at ready-made products I could potentially buy, but I wanted the satisfaction of doing most of it for myself. I knew right-off-the-bat that I’d be replacing the extruder as it seems clear to me vast progress has been made about that point.

It’s taken me weeks, but I’ve got the machine operating, at least in all regards except for an extruder. I’ve documented the key steps I took to get this machine in to a usable state again on my Episode 1 project page here.

Read more “Cupcake155 Episode 1”

MakerBot Plastruder Modified For Slightly Enhanced Awesomeness

Hello world, so I’ve been working very hard at getting my most awesome MakerBot working. It’s been a patience invoking venture and also extremely educational. The MakerBot employs some rather brilliant little tricks that make it simple, strong and friggin cheap. It’s a great gadget to have, though it’s definitely NOT for those who want everything now and aren’t capable of taking their time to do the job correctly.

Meet My Mod

So, in trying to get my MakerBot rockin, I’ve had to debug some stuff in my assembly. The instructions given on assembly are outstanding considering how much stuff you need to do to build one. That said, they’re not flawlessly exhaustive either – and this isn’t yet an exact science. I found myself frustrated by the positioning of the circuit board (I’ll just call it a PCB for now) positioned on the thing that outputs the plastic (Plastruder/RepRap). As you can see in my included photos, I’ve moved the PCB off to the side and flipped it behind the Plastruder.

A Before & After View of my MakerBot/RepRap Mod

Yes, it’s awesome

So as you can probably tell I love this mod because now I can quite easily see the plastic as it moves through. I can see little (or rather massive) teeth marks in the plastic due to contact with the gear on the motor that pulls it through.. So I can watch those marks move down in to the heater barrel – this has been helpful for me in trying to decide if some other printing problems I’ve been having have been due to any of a number of factors that no long include questioning if it’s actually feeding in more plastic..

Wanna see more?

You can check out more of this stuff here